A brief history of numerical systems – Alessandra King
Read Time:10 Second

A brief history of numerical systems – Alessandra King

0 0



View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-brief-history-of-numerical-systems-alessandra-king 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9… and 0. With just these ten symbols, we … .

source

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

42 thoughts on “A brief history of numerical systems – Alessandra King

  1. अद्भुत ! सभी पेरेंट्स को देखना चाहिए यह वीडियो और अपने बच्चों से इस बारे मैं बात करनी चाहिए। मैथ क्यूरोसिटी के बहुत जगह है घर पर होने वाली बातचीत मैं Homeschoolers मैं Math Curiosity पैदा करने के लिए हम भी प्राइमरी के बच्चों के साथ काम और कोशिशें कर रहे हैं

  2. This also shows me that school teaches, in the vast majority of cases, horribly. I like that ted and many other channels show us why maths are important for our life. Fortunately I could get really good teachers even my mom that did her best in order to teach me in many different ways and my father as well as a engineer. I wanna become an architect and I'm making the best option in my life. 🙂 I'm really into Maths, Physics, History, Lecture, Grammar. Nothing could make me happier. Living in a horrible school system is hard, but you made the decision in order to improve your knowledge.

  3. Zero is not invented by mayans where you got some imagination about zero . It is often used by indians in 500 BC as " Sunyata " in budhist manuscripts… and latter used by aryabhat.. And letter develpod in decimal place value by bramhagupta …… Where as mayans so called used a notation not "zero" in 40-50 BC…
    Why there is so hatred of indian or asian invantions…
    Why you pepole always try to hinder asian invantions …
    Its not fare….

  4. Excellent video. Philochrony is the theory that describes the nature of time and demonstrates its existence. Philochrony establishes an analogy between zero and time thus arising the linear zero.

  5. Note: There is no reasonable programmer who would write in binary today: it would probably be faster to make your own development tools from scratch than use one that uses binary. So technically, yes, programmers do use binary, but VERY rarely, and never to do anything useful. The closest to binary you're gonna get is some hex digits when you're working with raw data files.
    If you HAVE used binary to code anything, firstly, props to you, and also, how long did it take, and WHY?

  6. Why ten? People usually assume it's because we have ten fingers, which makes sense. But I see something about the arithmetic of number ten itself which makes it practical for use in positional notation. Draw a cross hair grid like a big + sign. Put a pebble in say the top right quadrant to represent 1. Move it to the next quadrant position clockwise, the bottom right, that represents 2. Bottom left for 3, top left for 4. Keep it there but now add another pebble in the top right, so now you have a representation for 4 + 1, or 5. To cut a long story short, once all four quadrants are each occupied by one pebble (or pencil mark if you like) using this rule you have a representation for ten, based on the fact that 1+2+3+4=10.

    Of course you could achieve the same thing with a grid with, say, just three spaces, like a Mercedes star, which means using the base 6, or maybe one with 5 spaces for base 15. Evidence for the 4-space cross hair grid origin could be the form of the addition sign, +, we use (yes, I know there are other explanations for that). And that if fingers still have to be involved, there are 4 distinct spaces between each finger on one hand – or handprint – to place your pebbles or marks.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Previous post Highlights 493 Role of Judiciary in Federal structure
Next post STUDENT EXPENSES IN NORWAY | Indian student abroad | Study in Norway | Cost of students in Norway |